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“You’re Going to Regret Not Trying”

In Updates by Punita Rice

Earlier this year I mentioned my outreach organization ISAASE‘s “Be Inspired” project. (In case you missed the post, it’s here). For the project, I connected with journalist Jashvina Shah about navigating the world of sports journalism (which isn’t exactly known for its welcoming attitude towards women), establishing a subscription service to a private sports reporting site, and why she loves working in journalism. She …

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An Interview with American Bazaar

In Updates by Punita Rice

About a month ago, I chatted with Jayshal Sood of American Bazaar Magazine about the work of ISAASE. In the interview, we talked about my research findings, including the reality that South Asian American students are diverse, may have less-than-ideal experiences in school, and don’t always get support they need from teachers. We also chatted about low teacher cultural proficiency, …

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Teachers, How Are You Teaching About Charlottesville?

In Updates by Punita Rice

Teachers, how are you teaching about Charlottesville? I’ve been thinking about this since teachers and students are heading back to school in the coming weeks. Teachers are going to need to engage with students about the recent events in Charlottesville, and the intense mood of the country. And, teachers will have to be prepared to have meaningful discussions about tolerance, …

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A Chat with Shaun Jayachandran

In Updates by Punita Rice

If you’re familiar with my outreach organization ISAASE (pronounced “iss-ah-say”), have you seen the “Be Inspired” project yet? The project is all about inspiring the next generation of young South Asian American students, by sharing profiles on diverse role models and diverse stories of success. For our first interview for the project, I connected with Shaun Jayachandran. Shaun Jayachandran is a …

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Cultural Appropriation and Aladdin

In Updates by Punita Rice

I have a confession to make: I’m excited about the live action Aladdin. Even though it’s problematic, racist, etc., and even though I do (mostly) accept the “responsibility” of calling out that which is unnecessarily and inappropriately offensive, I’m also sometimes exhausted by the weight of conversations around cultural appropriation and the desire to just… like, enjoy a movie sometimes. …

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Loyola Alumni Story

In Updates by Punita Rice

I recently did a Q&A for the Loyola University Maryland Alumni Association’s Alumni Stories (I did my Masters in teaching there). In it, I got to share just a little bit about the work ISAASE is doing to support South Asian American students. You can learn more about ISAASE here, or if you’re interested, you can read the interview / alumni …

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Travel Ban

In Updates by Punita Rice

I got an opportunity to share my thoughts on the travel ban in an op-ed for the Baltimore Sun. It was published over the weekend in their online edition, and went out this morning in the print edition. I wrote about my toddler’s love of firetrucks, what it means to be a good neighbor, and what I see as fading …

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Teachers and South Asian American Students

In Updates by Punita Rice

I wrote another article for The Aerogram on some of the key findings of my research on teachers and South Asian American students. Specifically, the article provides a (brief) overview of South Asian American students’ experiences in schools. Here’s the gist: Teachers don’t know much about South Asian American students. Teachers lack cultural proficiency as related to their South Asian …

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Why Research on South Asian American Students Matters

In Updates by Punita Rice

I wrote an article for The Aerogram on why research on South Asian American students matters. Here’s an excerpt: There is a lack of distinction made between different kinds of Asians in existing literature, and a particular dearth of existing literature on South Asian American students. This means teachers can’t really understand these students’ cultures, and thus can’t provide culturally responsive instruction to …

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Thanks for the Memories, Johns Hopkins

In Updates by Punita Rice

I can’t believe my doctoral program at Johns Hopkins University has come to an end. It’s the end of an era. This past couple of weeks after graduating from have been surreal. (Especially as it’s begun to sink in that from now on, there will be no more homework in my life. Well no more of my own homework anyway.) Thanks …