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ISAASE Name Pronunciation Guide

In Teaching by Punita Rice

Having your name pronounced correctly is a big deal. But, as I wrote a post over at the website for my outreach organization, ISAASE, it can be an overwhelming task for a teacher to be expected to perfectly pronounce an entire (or multiple) rosters of complicated, foreign names. If you’re interested, here’s an excerpt from the ISAASE Name Pronunciation Guide, …

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Why Pronouncing Students’ Names Correctly is Important

In Teaching by Punita Rice

There are a million names from as many backgrounds, so it can feel overwhelming to expect teachers to get every single name right. But pronouncing students’ names correctly does matter. Here, I’m sharing YouTube video I recorded on why pronouncing names correctly is important, and I’m also sharing my list of practice ideals for how teachers can get names right. Read on for …

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Pronouncing Students’ Names Correctly Should Be a Big Deal – EdWeek

In Teaching by Punita Rice

I wrote an essay for Education Week Teacher about why pronouncing students’ names correctly is — and should be — a big deal. In the piece, I spoke about why mispronouncing students’ names is problematic (and can be a kind of microaggression), what my own experience has been with my own name, information about the ISAASE Name Pronunciation Guide, and actionable …

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“Your Parents Didn’t Immigrate For You To Mispronounce Your Own Name”

In Culture by Punita Rice

Have you come across the sentiment: “your parents didn’t immigrate just for you to mispronounce your own name?” One variation of this sentiment appeared from Twitter user @Zablizzle (as seen on the Instagram account for @the_indian_feminist): “Your parents didn’t immigrate across an ocean for you to mispronounce your own name so it fits better in someone else’s mouth. #stop” (1/2) “I’m …

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Media

Radio New Zealand (October 2018) Kathryn Ryan, host of Radio New Zealand’s Nine to Noon, interviews Dr. Rice live, on the importance of name pronunciation and cultural proficiency in the classroom. Read or listen here. District Administration Magazine (October 2018) Matt Zalaznik for District Administration Magazine on name pronunciation in K-12 here. American Bazaar (August 2018) A discussion with American …

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On Cultural Proficiency – Radio New Zealand Interview

In Teaching by Punita Rice

Last week, I chatted with Kathryn Ryan, host of Radio New Zealand’s Nine to Noon (live!) about the importance of cultural proficiency in education, name pronunciation, and why teachers should understand their students’ backgrounds. The gist of our conversation was this: My saying your name correctly is a way of showing you respect… that empowers the student.  (More here). You can …

Outreach and Other Work

Dr. Rice’s primary work is tied to her area of research, centered around South Asian American students, and is done through her organization ISAASE (“Improving South Asian American Students’ Experiences). Her current projects center around improving the overall experiences of South Asian American students in K-12 settings. Dr. Rice founded ISAASE as an organization that aims to improve South Asian …

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Tips for Teaching South Asian American Students

In Teaching by Punita Rice

My outreach & advocacy organization ISAASE (here’s the post about the organization) just released a one-sheet with quick tips for how teachers can support South Asian American students. Teaching South Asian students isn’t fundamentally different from teaching any other students — but like teaching any or all other students, teachers have to be mindful about recognizing diversity of students. This …

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Facts on South Asian Americans

In Teaching by Punita Rice

My outreach organization ISAASE (here’s a post about what we do) just put out a simple, one-sheet document that contains “fast facts” on South Asian American students. This South Asian students fact sheet provides a simple overview of (the diverse) South Asian American student backgrounds, the key issues related to South Asian American students’ experiences and selected data points, and …